Posted on: August 11th, 2010 Comically Challenged: Morning Glories #1

Here’s a little bit of truth coming your way: I hate fictional groups of teenagers that include all the stereotypes. It just doesn’t happen in nature. When I was in high school, I did not once find myself in a room with one of each of the cliques. Take Breakfast Club for example. A classic movie but I hated the fact that there was one nerd, one burnout, one jock, one prep, and one freak. It’s unnatural; each group should not have an equal representation in the detention pie chart. But it always happens in stories. Most recently from Image in Nick Spencer and Joe Eisma’s Morning Glories.

For what it’s worth, the premise is pretty decent. Six kids have been recruited from around the world to attend Morning Glory Academy. It’s an alternative education preparatory school. (Which of course means it’s either prepping future heroes or super villains-that’s just how it always works in these stories. However, we’re not dealing with capes in the this book…yet.) Well, all the kids are all getting acquainted with one another and find out that they all share the same birthday and it’s today and they’re all 16. If that didn’t raise enough suspicion, one tries to contact her father and he denies having a daughter. Come to find out, there are a lot of things about the school that oozes evil.

See? Not too bad of a plot line. And that would be great, if the book wasn’t so damn annoying. I won’t lie to you, I was never a angsty teen. I basically fumbled my way through high school and college and that was the end of that. No real trauma. No emotional scarring. I guess I didn’t do it right. It would seem that way because each and every one of these characters seem like they are nothing short of socially inept worms. Going back to the stereotypes, let’s take a look at our cast of characters: Casey the super smart, super pretty, super blonde protagonist, Ike the smarmy psychopathic rich kid, Zoe the popular slut, Hunter the nice guy from an uncomfortable home setting, Jane the really intense emo girl that has changed her name to Jade and writes deep thoughts in a journal, Jun the cocky, tough kid from Tokyo. Are those typical labels? No. This book does delve deeper than ‘football star’ and ’stoner kid’ but it’s still awfully eclectic for my taste. We’re one wheelchair and one melanin-blessed kid away from an after-school special.

MorningGlories

The writing itself is good enough to make me hate everyone in the book. I hope that was Spencer’s goal. Like I said, the setting and plot are strong enough and he’s working that whole mysterious master plan angle, but there’s only so much teenage whining I can take. I don’t try and pretend I could ever make it as a high school teacher. If we could cut back on the over-the-top character elements, I think I’d like it better.

The art isn’t remarkable. It gets the job done but I can’t really point out anything that stood out. Even when Joe Eisma had the opportunity to go big with the little gore that exists in the book, he chose to be very understated. It’s not good, it’s not bad, it just is. Sorry, Joe.

I’m reading a lot of praise for this book online and I have to tell you, I don’t know what the fuss is about. It’s one thing to make your main characters anti-heroes but it’s another thing entirely just to make them all unlikable. I sort of want them all to die in the school. Sounds a bit much but after this issue, I wouldn’t really mind. I’d never drop a book after one issue but I’m not really looking forward to reading the next issue.

One Response to “Comically Challenged: Morning Glories #1”

  1. Chain Reactions | Morning Glories #1 | Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources – Covering Comic Book News and Entertainment Says:
    August 14th, 2010 at 10:13 am

    [...] Auburn Slavec, Giant Killer Squid: "The writing itself is good enough to make me hate everyone in the book. I hope that was Spencer’s goal. Like I said, the setting and plot are strong enough and he’s working that whole mysterious master plan angle, but there’s only so much teenage whining I can take. I don’t try and pretend I could ever make it as a high school teacher. If we could cut back on the over-the-top character elements, I think I’d like it better." [...]

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